Exam date

When's the 2016 exam? Wednesday 8th June, am.

Tuesday, 17 April 2012

Tues17th: 13C task

Today YOU will be researching and delivering the lesson, which ties into our 1st practice MediaReg essay on arguments for/against the PCC

You will each have up to 9.15 to research at least 1 source (which you identify to me so I can confirm that everyone is using a unique source/article), type up your notes (keep them BRIEF + to the point; only quote where absolutely necessary - we have just 30mins to get feedback from each person AND discuss these findings) either for or against the PCC. Reflecting the balance of the arguments, 3 of you will research the pro-PCC arguments, the rest of you the anti- lines.
The quickest way to do this is to type into Word, then copy/paste into a blog post comment at the end.

If you quickly get through one source, make a start on another!



By 9.15, deliver your findings as a comment to this post, starting this comment with your name, the URL of the source/s you used (+author/organisation name + publication date if thats not already obvious from the link + is stated on the web page), + then a list of points (each on a separate line).
After discussing the overall findings I'll compile all of these (+ those from the other class) this evening into a Word document, and embed it here. [unfortunately several of your colleagues in 13A couldn't follow the complex task of posting comments to the 13A post; I've deleted the comments they posted here]


and here are your findings (collated commen ts from below):
13C PCC Research Tues 17th April 2012

14 comments:

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  7. Conor O'Loughlin - http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=1&storycode=49128&c=1


    • Sir Christopher Meyer has stated that the phone hacking scandal should not be directly linked to the future of the PCC.
    • Speaking about the way the PCC dealt with the hacking scandal under his leadership, Meyer said: “In 2006 and 2007 a crime was investigated, a successful prosecution was mounted, two men went to jail, an editor resigned, and, after the trial, the regulator – the PCC – launched an inquiry, on the basis of which it published a widely-welcomed report that established new rules for the use of subterfuge by the press.
    • Delivering the annual lecture at the Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper makers he said: “Any government, even one in terminal decay like John Major’s in the mid-90s, had a significant in-built advantage over the press through its control of the public flow of official information.
    • He suggested that the PCC was not given enough power by the government to do anything about the build up to the Leveson enquiry.
    • Speaking about the way the PCC dealt with the hacking scandal under his leadership, Meyer said: “In 2006 and 2007 a crime was investigated, a successful prosecution was mounted, two men went to jail, an editor resigned, and, after the trial, the regulator – the PCC – launched an inquiry, on the basis of which it published a widely-welcomed report that established new rules for the use of subterfuge by the press.
    • Meyer insisted that the current PCC system should be built upon and strengthened, rather than move entirely, and gave Lord Justice Leverson suggestions about how to strengthen the PCC:

    • "That it is more independent from its paymasters than its predecessor...
    • "That, if fines and binding contracts are to be introduced, armies of lawyers do not follow in their wake”
    • "That ordinary people across the UK, who lay no claim to celebrity or public notoriety, are not forgotten in what has been so far a largely metropolitan debate between elite groups”

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  8. Sam Boyes
    http://www.pcc.org.uk/about/history.html


    In 2003 House of Commons Culture, Media and Sport Select committee concluded that “overall, standards of press behaviour, the Code and the performance of the Press Complaints Commission have improved over the last decade”.

    • The Press Council before were terrible before but the PCC brought up the standards again for press regulation their time.

    “The Government strongly supports freedom of speech and a free press. It is therefore appropriate that there should be a system of self-regulation. We are generally satisfied that the Press Complaints Commission's code of practice is both adequate and appropriate for its purpose. We therefore have no intention of bringing forward any new proposals.” “The Government strongly supports freedom of speech and a free press. It is therefore appropriate that there should be a system of self-regulation. We are generally satisfied that the Press Complaints Commission's code of practice is both adequate and appropriate for its purpose. We therefore have no intention of bringing forward any new proposals.”

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  9. George Gamble

    http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=1&storycode=49128&c=1

    In 2007 Roy Greenslade was moved to say complimentary things about the PCC for the first time.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/greenslade/2011/feb/08/pcc-twitter
    Roy Greenslade, 8/2/2011, Guardian website - Greenslade Blog

    The PCC received a lot of complaints after the Daily Mail and Independent on Sunday published story were the information was found on Twitter.
    They claimed the papers had breached privacy by republishing material from twitter.
    However, the PCC noted that Twitter is a social media website (a public forum) so it was the users fault for posting the information onto it.

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  10. Katie Mallows - http://pccwatch.co.uk/who-should-pcc-work-for/

    The PCC describe what it does well...but not who it does it for?
    Hmm... well Abbey Clancy, partner to Peter Crouch, had a recent case involving the PCC. They promised to keep her pregnancy quiet until after 12 weeks, then it would be publicly published. They choose to quote that they work 'behind the scenes' to protect peoples privacy, this is particularly edging towards public figures and celebs, involving Abbey Clancy's pregnancy.
    But it seems they like to contribute and offer background assistance to people in the eye of the 'press storm'. Such as Vanessa Perroncel, the woman at the centre of John Terry's story. Both of these stories caused great criticism, such as Peter Crouch for criticising 'The Sun' for breaking the news story about his partner, and Ms. Perroncel gave an interview to 'The Guardian'.
    Apart from this celebs benefit from the silence of the PCC, or at least...are not harmed from it.

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  11. Richard McLachlan17 April 2012 at 14:36

    Richard
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/media/the-press-complaints-commission-the-best-a-press-can-get-416438.html

    The PCC must not be seen as trapped in a metropolitan bubble. It is in fact a service for everyone.
    The PCC does not spend most of its time dealing with privacy complaints from London law-firms on behalf of celebrities
    Main concern of PCC is accuracy not privacy
    Making judgements on what is in the public's interest is the most contentious thing the PCC has to do
    There is a different range of views the PCC has to consider in order to determine what is in the public's interest
    Its a sensitive matter as 9 of 16 clauses of the industry's code of practice have a public-interest exception
    The PCC try and keep in touch with the public by having roadshows across major UK cities
    Editors and Journalists are part of the PCC - have experience

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  12. Asa Newmarch http://pccwatch.co.uk/category/brickbats/

    PCC countered claims about the lack of confidence from politicians. The director stated in defense that, the PCC has never been more active or pro-active, it has a high satisfaction rate and helping people more than before. The director also stated that the PCC has prevented intrusive information being punlished more than 100 times.

    PCC used unclear and inaccurate statistics and data, only released part of it. PCC has issued 1700 rulings and resolved more than 550 complaints. It is hard to understand how they got to that amount.

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  13. Sophie Dixon - http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/greenslade/2010/nov/19/dailymail-islam

    The Daily Mail reported 'A hard-working cafe owner has been ordered to tear down an extractor fan because the smell of her frying bacon offends Muslims'. The story was re-released in the Daily Telegraph and in the Metro.
    A lie? The neighbourhood was not known to be a muslim community, the woman was forced to remove the extractor fan due to her not having planning permission from the council.
    Complaints about the article were rejected by the PCC and they stated 'readers would not be misled due to finding out about the planning permission' although many comments showed another view were readers told muslims to 'go back to their own country if they didnt like it'

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  14. Harriet Harding Against the PCC. The hacked off campaign http://mediareg.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/hacked-off-campaign.html
    The hacked off campaign is a campaign for a public inquiry into phone hacking. The group was formed in response to the response of the met police. Their campaign was founded to campaign for a public inquiry into illegal information gathered by the police into related matters including the conduct of the police, politicians and mobile phone companies.
    Their website focuses on news, comments and victims stories.

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